Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Alternative Dramaturgies of the new millennium in Arabo-Islamic contexts and beyond


BOOK LAUNCH: May 2, 2015 at the Tangier American Legation (Tangier Morocco), and available for purchase at amazon.com and at fine bookstores worldwide. CMI is an all-volunteer sales-supported book cooperative, kindly lend your support..

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Selected papers from the 10th annual meeting of the
Tangier International Conferences: Performing Tangier 2014

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Buy it - on Amazon.com, click here

This volume contains 15 chapters (three French-language), plus an Introduction, one ‘emerging scholar’ paper, and two book reviews (of Terror and Performance by Rustom Bharucha, Routledge 2014).

Contributors are leading experts from seven countries (in the Americas, Europe and North Africa / Middle East regions): Canada (2), Egypt (2), Germany (1), Morocco (4), Syria (1), United Kingdom (5), USA (6).

Contents - 

Introduction – Khalid Amine (Tangier, Morocco)

Acknowledgements: International Centre for Performance Studies

1. Dramaturgie et postdramaturgie – Patrice Pavis (Canterbury, UK)

2. Dramaturgy as Performance of Holding (it) Together – Christel Weiler (Berlin, Germany)

3. Devising and Dramaturgy: Decolonizing Praxis – Ric Knowles (Guelph, Canada)

4. Alternative Dramaturgies Across Performance and Art: Richard Hawkins’ Restaging of the Performance-Archive of Tatsumi Hijikata – Stephen Barber (London, England, UK)

5. Answering Back and Returning the Gaze: Two Examples of ‘alternative dramaturgies informed by a Deaf and disability perspective’ (see image gallery below) – Kaite O’Reilly (Llarneth, Wales, UK)

6. ‘...beneath the surface’ of Told by the Wind: An Intercultural Experiment in an Alternative/Subtle Form of Performance Dramaturgy and Aesthetics – Phillip Zarrilli (Llarneth, Wales, UK)

7. Alternative Dramaturgy for Jihad Against Violence – Fawzia Afzal-Khan (New York, USA), Nesrin Alrefaai (London, England, UK / Damascus, Syria), and Katherine Mezur (San Francisco, California, USA)

8. Immersive Theatre – Marvin Carlson (New York, USA)

9. Dramaturg For Hire: Contextual Dramaturgy for a Global (St)Age – Avia Moore (Nelson, BC, Canada) and Jessica Applebaum (Brooklyn, NY, USA)

10. Brecht’s Theatre and Social Change in Egypt 1954-71 – Magdi Youssef (Cairo, Egypt)

11. Conflict Lies in the Body of the Beholder: Investigating Alternative Experimental Dramaturgies – Nesma Youssef Idris (Cairo, Egypt)

12. Cultural Manifestations of the Arab Revolution: New Visual Images and Performances (see image gallery below) – Touria Khannous (Baton Rouge, LA, USA)

13. The Problematics of History, Religion and Cross-Cultural Performance in Alternative Dramaturgies: Dramaturgy of Persian Plays in the West (see image gallery below) – Proshot Kalami (Lynn, Massachusetts, USA)

14. Dramaturgie et société dans Le gardien de Issam El Yousfi: du texte à la mise en scène de Abdelatti Lembarki – Rachid Mountasar (Taza, Morocco)

15. La “mécanique” de la création: écriture et mise en scène – Zohra Makach (Agadir, Morocco)

Emerging Scholar - Alternative Dramaturgy: Toward Understanding Intermediality in Theatre (see image gallery below) – Jaouad Radouani (Tangier, Morocco)

Book Review - Terror and Performance by Rustom Bharucha (Routledge, 2014, 978-1138014275)
– by Khalid Amine (Tangier, Morocco) and Redouan El Ayadi (Tetuan, Morocco)

Acknowledgements: Collaborative Media International


About the cover -  cover images selected from the following productions presented at Performing Tangier 2014: Dmoue Bel K’houl (Kolh Tears), presented by Anfass Theater Group; Hadda, presented by Dabateatr; and, Schizophrenia presented by Dabateatr. Photos contributed by Abdelaziz Khalili, a Tangier, Morocco-based artist (khaliliaziz @yahoo.fr) and design contributed by Andy Reynolds, a Washington, DC-based graphic designer (andynco @earthlink.net)

Granting / dedication - this book was made possible by a grant from the Crossroads Institute, in special recognition of Tina Packer, “alternative dramaturge extraordinaire” (and founder, Shakespeare & Company, Lenox, Massachusetts) on the release of her groundbreaking analysis, Women of Will: following the feminine in Shakespeare's plays (New York: Alfred A Knopf, 2015) and her lifetime commitment to making the world a better place through creative research, education, and performance. Of the Women of Will show (part performance, part master-class), the New York Times reports, “Ms. Packer isn’t onstage just to … seduce an audience; she’s as much a professor as she is a performer here”, for information click here


Image gallery - the following images accompany the papers referenced:

Answering Back and Returning the Gaze: Two Examples of ‘alternative dramaturgies informed by a Deaf and disability perspective’ – Kaite O’Reilly
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Figure 1. Jean St Clair in 'In Praise of Fallen Women: A Postmodern History of Prostitution,' photography courtesy of Patrick Baldwin.

Cultural Manifestations of the Arab Revolution: New Visual Images and Performances – Touria Khannous


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Figure 1. Mural by Hamid Ibrahim, Benghazi, Libya, 2011.This mural was featured at The "Creative Dissent" exhibit at the Arab American National Museum in Dearborn.  For information about the exhibit, see “Art Revolution Blooms After Arab Spring,” November 7, 2013. Photo by Jill Dougherty, used by permission to Touria Khannous.


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Figure 2. This mural is at the corner of Muhammed Mahmoud Street and Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt
The phots and translation of the poem were first published in http://www.jadaliyya.com/pages/index/9724/the-dramaturgy-of-a-street-corner
 
The photo also featured in the "Creative Dissent" exhibit at the Arab American National Museum in Dearborn.  For more information about the exhibit, refer to “Art Revolution Blooms After Arab Spring,” November 7, 2013. Photo by Mona Abaza, used by permission to Touria Khannous.


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Figure 3. A mural on Mohammed Mahmoud Street, featuring a hungry child eating a sandwich. Photo Mona Abaza, used by permission to Touria Khannous.This photo first appeared in an article written by Mona Abaza entitled “Is Cairene Graffiti Losing Momentum?” http://www.jadaliyya.com/pages/index/20635/is-cairene-graffiti-losing-momentum

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Figure 4. Stencil on freedom by Egyptian graffiti artist Nemo, , used by permission to Touria Khannous. see http://blog.globalstreetart.com/post/29469606488/nemo


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Figure 5. Stencil by Egyptian graffiti artist Nemo, used by permission to Touria Khannous.
http://blog.globalstreetart.com/post/29469606488/nemo

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Figure 6. Stencil by Egyptian graffiti artist Nemo, used by permission to Touria Khannous.
http://blog.globalstreetart.com/post/29469606488/nemo


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Figure 7. No to Sexual Harassment, by Egyptian graffiti artist Mira Shihadeh, Photo by Suzeeinthecity, used by internet fair-use principle - if in error email removal request to collaborative.media@ymail . com   

This photo is cited in an online article on “Feminist Street Art in the Egyptian Uprising” as part of the The WomanStats Project Blog

http://womanstats.wordpress.com/2013/06/10/feminist-street-art-in-the-egyptian-uprising/



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Figure 8. Mural by Mira Shihadeh and El Zeft, depicting a woman swarmed by a sea of men who mutter to her all kinds of excuses they have for harassing women. Photo by Suzeeinthecity,
used by internet fair-use principle - if in error email removal request to collaborative.media@ymail . com 

This photo is cited in an online article on “Feminist Street Art in the Egyptian Uprising” as part of the The WomanStats Project Blog
http://womanstats.wordpress.com/2013/06/10/feminist-street-art-in-the-egyptian-uprising/


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Figure 9. A mural by Egyptian graffiti artist El Zeft, showing a picture of Egyptian Queen Nefertiti in a mask in an attempt to ward off her male harassers. Photo by Suzeeinthecity, used by internet fair-use principle - if in error email removal request to collaborative.media@ymail . com  

This photo is cited in an online article on “Feminist Street Art in the Egyptian Uprising” as part of the The WomanStats Project Blog
 
http://womanstats.wordpress.com/2013/06/10/feminist-street-art-in-the-egyptian-uprising/


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Figure 10. A mural by Mira Shihadeh featuring one woman unveiled, a woman with a head scarf and a third woman with niqap.  The Arabic script states “do not label me.” Photo by Suzeeinthecity,
used by internet fair-use principle - if in error email removal request to collaborative.media@ymail . com 

This photo is cited in an online article on “Feminist Street Art in the Egyptian Uprising” as part of the The WomanStats Project Blog
 
http://womanstats.wordpress.com/2013/06/10/feminist-street-art-in-the-egyptian-uprising/


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Figure  11. The Uprising by Peter Snowdon, Photo by Peter Snowdon, used by permission to Touria Khannous. http://www.rienavoir.org/index.php?/films/the-uprising/


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Figure 12. The Uprising by Peter Snowdon, Photo by Peter Snowdon, used by permission to Touria Khannous. http://www.on-point.be/the-uprising/


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Figure 13. A Painting From Patricia Triki’s series “Free Art”. Photo by Patricia Triki, used by permission to Touria Khannous.http://www.ifa.de/en/visual-arts/ifa-galleries/past-exhibitions/rosy-future/patricia-k-triki.html


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Figure 14. From Patricia Triki’s series “Free Art”. Photo by Patricia Triki, used by permission to Touria Khannous.http://www.ifa.de/en/visual-arts/ifa-galleries/past-exhibitions/rosy-future/patricia-k-triki.html


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Figure 15. Arabic Calligraphy art entitled “Balance” by calligraphy artists el Seed and Hest1. Photo by el Seed, used by permission to Touria Khannous. Cited under article “Ancient calligraphy meets politics in modern Arabic graffiti.
http://www.dw.de/ancient-calligraphy-meets-politics-in-modern-arabic-graffiti/a-15145388


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Figure 16. Tunisian graffiti artist el Seed painted the tallest minaret in Tunisia with verses from the Quran.  His goal is to spread a message of peace and tolerance to the Islamic radicals. Tunisia, 2013. Photo by el Seed, used by permission to Touria Khannous.
http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/19/world/meast/el-seed-grafitti-minaret/


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Figure 17. “No, and a Thousand Times No” by Bahia Shehab, Cairo, Egypt, 2013. Photo by Bahia Shehab, used by permission to Touria Khannous. http://www.citysharing.ch/invited-projects~96.html


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Figure 18. “No, and a Thousand Times No” by Bahia Shehab, Cairo, Egypt, 2013. Photo by Bahia Shehab, used by permission to Touria Khannous. http://www.citysharing.ch/invited-projects~96.html


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Figure 19. “No, and a Thousand Times No” by Bahia Shehab, Cairo, Egypt, 2013. Photo owned by Bahia Shehab, used by permission to Touria Khannous. http://www.citysharing.ch/invited-projects~96.html


The Problematics of History, Religion and Cross-Cultural Performance in Alternative Dramaturgies: Dramaturgy of Persian Plays in the West – Proshot Kalami

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Figure 1. The original poster of 1980 Tehran production (used by permission to Proshot Kalami).

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Figure 2. Loughborough production 2009-2010, photograph by Kevin Ryan (used by permission to Proshot Kalami).

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Figure 3. Rehearsal picture of Loughborough production 2009-2010, photograph by Kevin Ryan (used by permission to Proshot Kalami).


Alternative Dramaturgy: Toward Understanding Intermediality in Theatre – Jaouad Radouani
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Figure 1. A chart showing the way the alternative/intermedial stage usurps reality thrice and re-presents it in a completely re-constructed shape.


Thursday, October 16, 2014

Collaborative Media International

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or cut and paste the link below into your browser:

http://collaborativemedia.blogspot.com/2009/03/welcome.html

Thank you for your interest in CMI

George F Roberson
Director - george.roberson @ fulbrightmail.org

Monday, June 9, 2014

Amazon best sellers

Amazon best sellers: #2 Morocco travel books, #5 business travel -- listing on July 11, 2014 
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Thursday, May 22, 2014

CMI / ICPS book launch at TALIM

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Tuesday, April 8, 2014

New international volume -- twenty-four papers, contributed by leading scholars from a dozen countries on three continents


(click images to view in larger format, photos by Abdelaziz Khalili, 
cover details listed at the bottom of this page)
Intermediality, Performance and the Public Sphere: selected papers from recent meetings of the Tangier International Conferences

Khalid Amine and George F Roberson, Editors
Jaouad Radouani, Editorial Associate 

$15 | ISBN 978-0-9824409-7-1
Buy it Amazon.com (click here) and other fine book shops

With special thanks and appreciation to: Carol Malt, friend of the arts; and, Gerald Loftus, Director (2010 to 2014), Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies

This book was made possible by a grant from the Crossroads Institute

This volume features a selection of key papers that were originally presented at recent meetings of the Tangier International Conferences. Convened amidst the still unfolding so-called ‘Arab Spring’, the themes of intermediality, performance and the public sphere have generated immense interest around the globe. Included are contributions from leading scholars on three continents and from a dozen countries: Austria, Canada, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Morocco, Nigeria, Poland, Spain, United Kingdom, and USA.

The book has two parts. The first focuses on the intermedial connections of theater, dance and the visual arts, with a specific concentration in documentary theatre, new media practices, staged photography and installations.

The second part aims at reframing the discussion on the public sphere and questioning the performative articulations of political critique. Indeed, the revolutionary "Arab Spring" has been fueled as never before by a ‘techno-imagination’ —a powerful and ever evolving relationship between images and texts.

A total of twenty-four papers are presented including: a preface by the editors; two chapters translated into English (from the original Arabic); three chapters presented in the original French, and three chapters contributed by emerging scholars.

Table of Contents

Prologue: Performing Tangier – Khalid Amine and George F Roberson 

I. Intermediality and Performance

Collaborative Choreography and Intermediality in Contemporary Dance: Frédéric Gies’ “danse praticable” – Gabriele Brandstetter

In the Mix: Contemporary Intermedial Theatre and Hybridity – Andy Lavender. To view article images, click here
 
Theatre in a State of Latency: The Radical Criticism of Rabih Mroué Performative Lectures – Katia Arfara

Revitalizing Opera on TV: Alexander Kluge’s TV Program “A Woman like a Volcano” - Klemens Gruber. To view articles images, click here
 
Talking in the City - based on the performance “in/of the city”: Tangier – Laurie Beth Clark and Michael Peterson

The Ceremony of Transformation: Performance and the New Media – Jose Luis Delgado Guitart

Le théâtre au regard de la performance – Pierre Katuszewski

Rabih Mroué et Lina Saneh, Comment ralentir l'occultation du corps/individu – Omar Fertat. To view article images, click here

II. Performance and the Public Sphere

The Performativity of Protest in its Filmic and Digital Representation – Stephen Barber

The Sound of the Street – Performance, Sound and Revolution in 1848 – Meike Wagner. To view article images, click here

“Nonviolent Terrorism” or the Legitimate Performance of Resistance? Hunger Strikes, Death Fasts, and a Habermasian Conception of Political Action and the Public Sphere – Amy Bartholomew

Western Im/Mobility: LIGNA’s Radioballet, Western Transit Zones and the Public Sphere – Wolf-Dieter Ernst. To view article images, click here

Riot of Dwarfs: on a possible negotiation of aisthesis – Berenika Szymanski-Düll

One Needs a Voice to Express Indignation: Debtors’ Oxymoronic Presence in the Public Sphere – Izabela Morska

Protest in the Arab Theatre: A Historical Outlook – Hassan Lamniai, translated by Jaouad Radouani

Le dernier Carnival de Dijon: Une politique festive et genrée – Philip Whalen. To view article images, click here

Performing Public Sphere: Theatre in Current Zimbabwe – Julius Heinicke

Scheherezade Goes West: Acting Out ‘as a’ Pakistani/American/Muslim/Wo/Man – Fawzia Afzal-Khan

Arab Writers: Arab Spring. The Arab Spring: An Unprecedented Spectacle – Rita S Nezami

Touria Jebrane: The Dynamics of Coincidence and Careful Choice - An Extract from Balaghat Al-Iltibass (Rhetoric of Ambiguity) – Mohammed Bahjaji, translated by Jaouad Radouani and Abdelaziz Al-Amrani

Emerging Scholars Papers

Je danserai malgré tout!: Tunisian public space performances in times of democratic transition – Anna Serlenga. To view article images, click here

Traces of Operation Desert Storm: Aesthetic Transformations of War – Kristin Flade

Exclusivity and the Colonisation of the Public Sphere in African Performance – Bode Ojoniyi

- - -

Acknowledgements, click here

Related books from Collaborative Media International (CMI), click here

Focus on Moroccan Arabic: A Practical Guide to Learning Moroccan Darija, click here

About the cover:

Features the performance, “Dialogue Between Body and Architecture”, by Graziella Boggiano, with the collaboration of many local Tanjawi performance artists, Tangier, Morocco, May 2009

Photos contributed by Abdelaziz Khalili, a Tangier, Morocco-based artist: khaliliaziz @ yahoo.fr

Design contributed by Andy Reynolds, a Washington, DC-based graphic designer: andynco @ earthlink.net 

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Le dernier Carnival de Dijon: Une politique festive et genrée – Philip Whalen

Figure 1. La Mère-Folle est pendue après un simulacre de procès à Dijon en 1935. Elle sera ensuite brûlée pendant le Carnival. Autorisation de reproduction donnée par le Pays de Bourgogne.

Figure 2. L’effigie de la Mère-Folle en train de brûler, pendant le Carnival de Dijon de 1935. Autorisation de reproduction donnée par le Pays de Bourgogne.

Figure 3. L’entrée du Logis de la Mère-Folle. Autorisation de reproduction donnée par Archives municipales de la Ville de Dijon, « Mère-Folle », (série 6Fi 269).